DIY: Remotely Monitor Your Aging Loved One (SmartThings + Initial State)

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95% of people age 75 and older have no desire to live anywhere but their own home and remain independent. You cannot be with them all of the time, and not knowing what is currently happening or happened while you were away can lead to an enormous amount of worry and anxiety. Several solutions that leverage a variety of web-connected sensors combined with a monitoring service have popped up in the last couple of years.

Alexa, Turn Up the Heat! | SmartThings

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<img class="alignleft" src="https://i0.wp.com/blog.smartthings.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/amazon-echo-thermostat_blog-hero-2.jpg?fit=683%2C405&ssl=1" alt="" width="407" height="243" />
<blockquote>SmartThings and Amazon Echo make it possible to control your connected thermostat with just your voice. Get ready to love the sound of your voice. Picture it: You're binge-watching Netflix, happily warm underneath your favorite blanket when you suddenly think Oh no! the sun went down 7 hours ago and now the room is too cold for me to grab my phone from the coffee table, let alone get up.</blockquote>

Centralite 3-Series Zigbee Motion Sensor for PEQ, SmartThings Hub, and other ZHA 1.2 Certified Hubs

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The 3-Series Motion Detector adds both security and advanced home automation features to your connected home. You can be notified when there’s movement in a certain area and even trigger lighting scenes, HVAC settings, and security alarms based on the detection of motion. The 3-Series Motion Sensor provides virtually limitless flexibility for interacting with your home!

 

 

 

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SmartThings adds 8 new products to beef up your connected home

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SmartThings, the home automation solution from Samsung, is announcing a new line of products that are compatible with its hub. Included is Osram Lightify, which is a tunable recessed light that allows the customer to switch the glow. Also in the mix is the Osram Lightify flood light, which is less controllable, as well as the company’s smart connected bulb which is dimmable.

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The future of smart home living

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SmartThings’ idea for smart living started with an unfortunate situation: A flood.

About four years ago, Samsung SmartThings Founder and CEO Alex Hawkinson was away from his mountain home for the winter. During that time, the power went out during a storm, the pipes froze — and when they burst, the house flooded.

SmartThings a platform that allows hundreds of smart devices (ranging from lighting, to door locks, to cameras, entertainment systems and everything in between) to be connected through one hub and easily controlled by just one smartphone app was born.

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Linux’s domination of home automation gizmos continues

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The Linux-dominated home automation business is still a fragmented free-for-all, but its also beginning to consolidate, with far fewer startups in 2015 compared to recent years.This month we saw several major product announcements from established players related to Linux. First, Googles Nest Labs announced the first device partners for its Weave home automation protocol using the Thread networking standard. Now Samsung, which began shipping its first Linux-based SmartThings hub last month, released a $249 sensor kit built around the hub. Meanwhile, in the larger Internet of Things world that includes industrial, as well as home automation, the Linux Foundations AllSeen Alliance announced a new certification program and security stack. In addition, Amazon unveiled an AWS IoT cloud platform available with starter kits based on Linux hacker boards (see below).

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Samsung’s Windows Phone compatible SmartThings home automation hub now available in UK

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Samsung has brought their recently announced new SmartThings Home Automation range to UK. The new Starter Kit, which includes the new Hub announced at IFA last week lets users control, secure and monitor their home from any location. Samsung only produces a Moisture Sensor but that is not part of the starter kit.

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SmartThings’ new home automation hub is sleeker, smarter, and still $99

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There are tons of options available when it comes to products designed for automating your home. SmartThings, the home automation company purchased by Samsung last year, has so far offered some unique features like open development tools and a capable radio-packed hub. They are continuing to build on these features with version 2.0 of their home automation hub.

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The Weekly Echo: playing around with skills and automation

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Even though it hasnt been released yet, Amazon Echo already works with Samsungs SmartThings to control additional connected home devices. The repertoire of things you can control with Alexa keeps growing, and it means Im going to need a second Amazon Echo soon for my downstairs time.

Alexa, the artificial intelligence and brains behind the Amazon Echo, keeps getting smarter and gaining new capabilities, so Ive got some cool new features to tell you about. Same app, different nameThe first thing you should know is that the iOS app you use to set up your Echo has gone through a name change. Instead of being called Amazon Echo, the app is now named Amazon Alexa.

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