The Pitfalls of the D.I.Y. Connected Home (Part 1)

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For the first time in recent memory, I had to call tech support. It wasn’t for my computer or my smartphone. It was for my house.
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This summer, I had the bright idea to connect my home to the Internet. As anyone who has walked into a Home Depot recently can tell you, the future has supposedly arrived. And it’s called the Internet of Things.

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Microsoft Wants To Put Windows 10 On Every Connected Gadget

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Microsoft Windows scarcely registers its presence on mobiles, at under 3% market share (according to comScore). With these boards, makers can build prototype-connected devices like home security systems, lighting controllers, weather-monitoring devices, or just learning projects like blinky lights controlled from a cellphone. These little hacker boards are to the connected, automated world of the future what the bare motherboards of the 1970s and ’80s were to the personal computing era that followed.

Image courtesy of fastcompany.com